Forty years of elephants in flight

We're an eclectic independent publisher located in Soho. We publish a little bit of everything—and a lot of interesting fiction, mysteries, history, politics, biography, art, design, & more. Welcome to our perspective on books and beyond.

dockawk:

Some Wodehouse Comix - by doctorawkward

dockawk:

Some Wodehouse Comix - by doctorawkward

craigfernandez:

JEEVES AND WOOSTER!

I started reading Wodehouse in college. I’d known about the author before then, but when I saw one of the titles tucked away in the college library one day, I decided to dig in and was immediately sucked into Bertie’s world. Over the years I read about a dozen of the titles and have bought a few compilations.

I’ve always found Wodehouse’s first person narration to be laugh out loud funny and when I stumbled across Fry and Laurie’s series, I wondered how they would be able to capture the spirit of the stories as they unfold specifically from Bertie’s mind onto the page.

What struck me in the first viewing was how well they were able to capture the millieu of Bertie’s world with simple visual cues. I think it has to do with elasticity of Hugh Laurie’s face, his ability to seem completely baffled and stupefied…  Pairing that Fry’s elan and unspoken intellectual superiority, the episodes just sing with a completely different type of humor (similar to Laurel and Hardy) but one that woundn’t seem alien to Wodehouse…

I just love the series and I want to end with a quick tip of the hat to Ferdinand Fairfax who directed the series.

Illustrations from P.G. Wodehouse in His Own Words.

theatlantic:

Public Libraries Are Better Than Congress, Baseball, and Apple Pie, Say Americans

Every so often, a grave and concerned person will ask (as, in fact, the New York Times asked last year): “Do We Still Need Libraries?” Hasn’t the Internet kind of, you know, ended all that? Aren’t libraries falling behind?
Tellingly, the Times could find no one to argue against libraries, and that mirrors American sentiment pretty much exactly. A new Pew study finds that not only do Americans adore libraries, but a majority of us think they’re adjusting to new technology just fine. 
As my colleague Svati Narula reported, some 94 percent of Americans say that having a public library improves a community and that the local library is a “welcoming, friendly place.” 91 percent said they had never had “a negative experience using a public library, either in person or online.”
These sound like incredible approval ratings for any U.S. public institution. So I wondered: Just how incredible are they? How do other icons of Americana compare? 
Using exclusive and highly accurate statistical analysis techniques, I endeavored to find out. Here are the results.
Read more. [Image: studioVin/Svetlana Foote]

theatlantic:

Public Libraries Are Better Than Congress, Baseball, and Apple Pie, Say Americans

Every so often, a grave and concerned person will ask (as, in fact, the New York Times asked last year): “Do We Still Need Libraries?” Hasn’t the Internet kind of, you know, ended all that? Aren’t libraries falling behind?

Tellingly, the Times could find no one to argue against libraries, and that mirrors American sentiment pretty much exactly. A new Pew study finds that not only do Americans adore libraries, but a majority of us think they’re adjusting to new technology just fine. 

As my colleague Svati Narula reported, some 94 percent of Americans say that having a public library improves a community and that the local library is a “welcoming, friendly place.” 91 percent said they had never had “a negative experience using a public library, either in person or online.”

These sound like incredible approval ratings for any U.S. public institution. So I wondered: Just how incredible are they? How do other icons of Americana compare? 

Using exclusive and highly accurate statistical analysis techniques, I endeavored to find out. Here are the results.

Read more. [Image: studioVin/Svetlana Foote]

“There are moments, Jeeves, when one asks oneself, ‘Do trousers matter?’”
"The mood will pass, sir.”

(Source: ghostbees)

“If I have a fault as a writer, which is very doubtful, I should say that it was a tendency to devote myself a little too closely to the subject of butlers.”

—   P.G. Wodehouse
slightlyignorant:

-David Quammen

slightlyignorant:

-David Quammen

(via breathingbooks)

“"To my colleagues on the staff of the Warren Commission who knew that Truth was their only client" #JFK50”

—   

-dedication by Howard P. Willens in HISTORY WILL PROVE US RIGHT 

Inside the Warren Commission Report on the Assassination of John F. Kennedy

#JFK50: “The great enemy of the truth is very often not the lie, deliberate, contrived and dishonest, but the myth, persistent, persuasive and unrealistic.” #JFKquotes
T-3 days to the #JFK50 Anniversary. For the definitive story of that fateful day in November 1963, read:
HISTORY WILL PROVE US RIGHT written by the last surviving member of the Warren Commission.