Forty years of elephants in flight

We're an eclectic independent publisher located in Soho. We publish a little bit of everything—and a lot of interesting fiction, mysteries, history, politics, biography, art, design, & more. Welcome to our perspective on books and beyond.

Happy Holidays, one and all! 2014 is going to be a big year for Overlook and we’re particularly excited to be publishing Wesley Stace’s new novel, WONDERKID next March.

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We’re not the only ones who are looking forward to the latest from the acclaimed singer-songwriter, formerly known as John Wesley Harding. Over the next week and a half we’ll be counting down the final days of 2013 by sharing sneak peeks at early reviews from some of our favorite authors and musicians who have had a chance to read an advance copy.

We couldn’t be more excited for Gary “Little Failure” Shteyngart’s forthcoming memoir to publish next month. In the meantime, the man behind our favorite book trailer of 2013 has some high praise for WONDERKID.

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“Finally, a sex, drugs and rock ’n’ roll book for Dan Zanes fans! Wonderkid also happens to be one of the best books about fathers and sons since Turgenev.” —Gary Shteyngart, author of Super Sad True Love Story

“Jeeves lugged my purple socks out of the drawer as if he were a vegetarian fishing a caterpillar out of his salad.”

—   

An excellent turn of phrase from My Man Jeeves

What’s your favorite Wodehouse simile?

Want to know more about Wodehouse himself? P.G. Wodehouse In His Own Words examines the author’s life through his work and letters. Pick up a copy today.

Anger, distress, confusion: how we feel when someone says they don’t like P.G. Wodehouse.

(Source: tanshoesandpinkshoelaces, via jeevesandwooster)

dockawk:

Some Wodehouse Comix - by doctorawkward

dockawk:

Some Wodehouse Comix - by doctorawkward

craigfernandez:

JEEVES AND WOOSTER!

I started reading Wodehouse in college. I’d known about the author before then, but when I saw one of the titles tucked away in the college library one day, I decided to dig in and was immediately sucked into Bertie’s world. Over the years I read about a dozen of the titles and have bought a few compilations.

I’ve always found Wodehouse’s first person narration to be laugh out loud funny and when I stumbled across Fry and Laurie’s series, I wondered how they would be able to capture the spirit of the stories as they unfold specifically from Bertie’s mind onto the page.

What struck me in the first viewing was how well they were able to capture the millieu of Bertie’s world with simple visual cues. I think it has to do with elasticity of Hugh Laurie’s face, his ability to seem completely baffled and stupefied…  Pairing that Fry’s elan and unspoken intellectual superiority, the episodes just sing with a completely different type of humor (similar to Laurel and Hardy) but one that woundn’t seem alien to Wodehouse…

I just love the series and I want to end with a quick tip of the hat to Ferdinand Fairfax who directed the series.

Illustrations from P.G. Wodehouse in His Own Words.

theatlantic:

Public Libraries Are Better Than Congress, Baseball, and Apple Pie, Say Americans

Every so often, a grave and concerned person will ask (as, in fact, the New York Times asked last year): “Do We Still Need Libraries?” Hasn’t the Internet kind of, you know, ended all that? Aren’t libraries falling behind?
Tellingly, the Times could find no one to argue against libraries, and that mirrors American sentiment pretty much exactly. A new Pew study finds that not only do Americans adore libraries, but a majority of us think they’re adjusting to new technology just fine. 
As my colleague Svati Narula reported, some 94 percent of Americans say that having a public library improves a community and that the local library is a “welcoming, friendly place.” 91 percent said they had never had “a negative experience using a public library, either in person or online.”
These sound like incredible approval ratings for any U.S. public institution. So I wondered: Just how incredible are they? How do other icons of Americana compare? 
Using exclusive and highly accurate statistical analysis techniques, I endeavored to find out. Here are the results.
Read more. [Image: studioVin/Svetlana Foote]

theatlantic:

Public Libraries Are Better Than Congress, Baseball, and Apple Pie, Say Americans

Every so often, a grave and concerned person will ask (as, in fact, the New York Times asked last year): “Do We Still Need Libraries?” Hasn’t the Internet kind of, you know, ended all that? Aren’t libraries falling behind?

Tellingly, the Times could find no one to argue against libraries, and that mirrors American sentiment pretty much exactly. A new Pew study finds that not only do Americans adore libraries, but a majority of us think they’re adjusting to new technology just fine. 

As my colleague Svati Narula reported, some 94 percent of Americans say that having a public library improves a community and that the local library is a “welcoming, friendly place.” 91 percent said they had never had “a negative experience using a public library, either in person or online.”

These sound like incredible approval ratings for any U.S. public institution. So I wondered: Just how incredible are they? How do other icons of Americana compare? 

Using exclusive and highly accurate statistical analysis techniques, I endeavored to find out. Here are the results.

Read more. [Image: studioVin/Svetlana Foote]