Forty years of elephants in flight

We're an eclectic independent publisher located in Soho. We publish a little bit of everything—and a lot of interesting fiction, mysteries, history, politics, biography, art, design, & more. Welcome to our perspective on books and beyond.

Missing Reels galleys just arrived in the Overlook office! Be sure to check out author Farran Smith Nehme’s blog Self-Styled Siren for more information and don’t miss the kind words Clive James has said about Farran and her work: “In being so comprehensive, yet so easily readable, she is helping to set the standards of a new critical medium.”
Getting ready for BEA! Be sure to stop by The Overlook Press booth!

Congratulations MATT WHYMAN for winning the 2014 Angus Book Award for his novel THE SAVAGES

THE SAVAGES is a uniquely crafted book about social mores, resilience, and forging your own way – amidst a family of cavalier cannibals! 

The Savage family hides an unusual secret until private detective Vernon English discovers the truth behind the tight-knit family’s predatory tastes; but that’s not all the family is hiding. From mother Angelica’s compulsive shopping habits, father Titus’ suspicious business dealings, 12-year-old Ivan’s dangerous pranks, and teenage daughter Sasha’s rebellious relationship with a vegetarian, there’s more to the Savages than meets the eye. This darkly funny masterpiece of mystery, family values, and murder, can’t be missed.

“That is part of the beauty of all literature. You discover that your longings are universal longings, that you’re not lonely and isolated from anyone. You belong.”

—   F. Scott Fitzgerald (via unexposedexposae)

(via millionsmillions)

“The object of all good literature is to purge the soul of its petty troubles.”

—   Summer Lightning, P.G. Wodehouse (via ameliapeabodyemerson)
"An ambiguous terror, in truth attractive on some level: to lay yourself open to the cruelties and mercies and whims of other people."—Beautiful Fools, R. Clifton Spargo’s novel illuminating the love that couldn’t heal F. Scott and Zelda’s brokenness

"An ambiguous terror, in truth attractive on some level: to lay yourself open to the cruelties and mercies and whims of other people."—Beautiful FoolsR. Clifton Spargo’s novel illuminating the love that couldn’t heal F. Scott and Zelda’s brokenness

This Elizabeth Drew Interview About Covering Watergate was Amazing.

wnyc:

Take a listen.

books0977:

The Novel Reader (1888). Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-1890). Oil on canvas.
As art historian Judy Sund says it, for “this imagined female…[to be] reading a yellow book (i.e. a modern novel) with wide-eyed attention reflects the artist’s conviction that everyone should read, and suggests anew that his conception of the ideal woman included a devotion to the modern fiction that was modeled on his own.” (“Favoured Fictions,” p. 260).

books0977:

The Novel Reader (1888). Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-1890). Oil on canvas.

As art historian Judy Sund says it, for “this imagined female…[to be] reading a yellow book (i.e. a modern novel) with wide-eyed attention reflects the artist’s conviction that everyone should read, and suggests anew that his conception of the ideal woman included a devotion to the modern fiction that was modeled on his own.” (“Favoured Fictions,” p. 260).

(via politicsprose)

universitybookstore:

"Some people scorn a cat and think it not an essential; but the Clemens tribe are not of these."—Mark Twain

While dogs may be a man’s best friend, a cat is a writer’s truest companion. Both are creatures of solitary pursuits drawn together in moments of mutual appreciation then separating again to chase inspiration or the stray bird in the garden.

“Love? What is it? Most natural painkiller. What there is … LOVE.”—William S. Burroughs, last entry in his diary, written on the occasion of the death of his cat.

This year marks the 40th anniversary of Richard Nixon’s resignation from the White House and what better way to mark this occasion than to take a little look back at the man of the hour. 

Join us this Saturday, May 17th, as Elizabeth Drew, author of WASHINGTON JOURNAL: Reporting Watergate and Richard Nixon’s Downfall, speaks at Politics and Prose in Washington DC at 6pm.