Forty years of elephants in flight

We're an eclectic independent publisher located in Soho. We publish a little bit of everything—and a lot of interesting fiction, mysteries, history, politics, biography, art, design, & more. Welcome to our perspective on books and beyond.

chroniclebooks:

Loving these acts of literary disobedience.

crimexturtle:

Spending my night ruining the free world

On Friday April 11th, Rizzoli Bookstore will be forced to close its doors after 29 years in the six-story architectural gem located at 31 West 57th Street.
The Landmarks Preservation Commission is currently evaluating whether Rizzoli Bookstore’s interior warrants “interior landmark designation.” Join the fight and check out the Save Rizzoli website for more info. 

On Friday April 11th, Rizzoli Bookstore will be forced to close its doors after 29 years in the six-story architectural gem located at 31 West 57th Street.

The Landmarks Preservation Commission is currently evaluating whether Rizzoli Bookstore’s interior warrants “interior landmark designation.” Join the fight and check out the Save Rizzoli website for more info. 

John Spurling’s THE TEN THOUSAND THINGS launches tomorrow! 

Join us as R. Clifton Spargo, author of the critically acclaimed novel BEAUTIFUL FOOLS, discusses the tragic and storied romance of F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald at the Innisfree Poetry Bookstore  on April 18th at 6:00 PM. 
Innisfree Poetry Bookstore1203 13th Street2008-2010 Delancey PlaceBoulder, CO 80302
R. Clifton Spargo, a Chicago-based fiction writer and cultural critic, is the author of BEAUTIFUL FOOLS, The Last Affair of Zelda and Scott Fitzgerald. A graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, he is the Provost’s Postgraduate Visiting Writer in Fiction in the Department of English at the University of Iowa for 2013-14. 
A past winner of Glimmer Train’s Award for New Writers as well as their Fiction Open Contest, he has published stories in The Antioch Review, FICTION, Glimmer Train, SOMA, and The Kenyon Review, among other places. His essays and reviews on literature, culture, and rock music have been featured in Raritan, Commonweal, The Yale Review, The Chicago Tribune, The Baltimore Sun, The Cambridge Companion to Bob Dylan, Newcity, and the fashion magazine Glo. And he writes a blog called “The HI/LO,” on the interplay between high and low culture, for The Huffington Post.
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Praise for BEAUTIFUL FOOLS

 “Mr. Spargo’s novel certainly succeeds beyond pastiche in providing a timely reminder that the love between Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald, even in destructive decline, was a force to be reckoned with beyond the experience of many—maybe most—human beings.”—Wall Street Journal

“Spargo’s book is richly imagined, and paints a delightfully detailed portrait of Cuba of 1939. It’s a positively delicious travelogue.”
—The Chicago Tribune
 
“This approach to the Fitzgeralds’ story is the most successful of the bunch… With its contained arc and energetic plotting Beautiful Fools takes the focus off more familiar episodes in the couple’s history.” —The New Yorker
 
“In Spargo’s hands, the Fitzgeralds emerge as fully human … it’s the one version of the story that resists the temptation to glamorize Scott and Zelda out of their humanity.” —Washington Post

Join us as R. Clifton Spargo, author of the critically acclaimed novel BEAUTIFUL FOOLS, discusses the tragic and storied romance of F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald at the Innisfree Poetry Bookstore  on April 18th at 6:00 PM. 

Innisfree Poetry Bookstore
1203 13th Street
2008-2010 Delancey Place
Boulder, CO 80302

R. Clifton Spargo, a Chicago-based fiction writer and cultural critic, is the author of BEAUTIFUL FOOLS, The Last Affair of Zelda and Scott Fitzgerald. A graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, he is the Provost’s Postgraduate Visiting Writer in Fiction in the Department of English at the University of Iowa for 2013-14.

A past winner of Glimmer Train’s Award for New Writers as well as their Fiction Open Contest, he has published stories in The Antioch Review, FICTION, Glimmer Train, SOMA, and The Kenyon Review, among other places. His essays and reviews on literature, culture, and rock music have been featured in Raritan, Commonweal, The Yale Review, The Chicago Tribune, The Baltimore Sun, The Cambridge Companion to Bob Dylan, Newcity, and the fashion magazine Glo. And he writes a blog called “The HI/LO,” on the interplay between high and low culture, for The Huffington Post.

—-

Praise for BEAUTIFUL FOOLS

 “Mr. Spargo’s novel certainly succeeds beyond pastiche in providing a timely reminder that the love between Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald, even in destructive decline, was a force to be reckoned with beyond the experience of many—maybe most—human beings.”Wall Street Journal

“Spargo’s book is richly imagined, and paints a delightfully detailed portrait of Cuba of 1939. It’s a positively delicious travelogue.”

The Chicago Tribune

 

“This approach to the Fitzgeralds’ story is the most successful of the bunch… With its contained arc and energetic plotting Beautiful Fools takes the focus off more familiar episodes in the couple’s history.”The New Yorker

 

“In Spargo’s hands, the Fitzgeralds emerge as fully human … it’s the one version of the story that resists the temptation to glamorize Scott and Zelda out of their humanity.”Washington Post

Delightful! 

“There is no surer foundation for a beautiful friendship than a mutual taste in literature.”

—   P.G. Wodehouse (via quotes-shape-us)
April showers bring May flowers? Wish it was May already! In the meantime why not brush up on the history and culture of flowers by reading Jennifer Potter’s SEVEN FLOWERS 

To celebrate the launch of Clifton Crais’ new memoir HISTORY LESSONS we thought we’d start our Friday off with a little trip through New Orleans! 

“This book is a triumphant, sustained, comic performance. I can’t recall a contemporary American novel anywhere near as funny. Be aware that WAITING FOR THE ELECTRICITY is defiantly un-PC, and also that it manages to provide between the lines as acute and mordant a reading of post-Communist Georgia as one could conceive. The narrator’s letters to Hillary Clinton are more brilliantly hapless than any of Herzog’s to his famous addressees. I got a kind of joy from experiencing Christina Nichol’s transformation of an extreme reality into further documentation of the human comedy. I don’t think I’ve ever before used the word “joy” in quite this way.”

—   Norman Rush raving about Christina Nichol’s new novel WAITING FOR THE ELECTRICITY 

Why Doesn't America Read Anymore?

Good one NPR, good one. The Facebook response was immense and hysterical