Forty years of elephants in flight

We're an eclectic independent publisher located in Soho. We publish a little bit of everything—and a lot of interesting fiction, mysteries, history, politics, biography, art, design, & more. Welcome to our perspective on books and beyond.

“There are moments, Jeeves, when one asks oneself, ‘Do trousers matter?’”
“The mood will pass, sir.”

—   P.G. Wodehouse, The Code of the Woosters (via booksandjazz)
P.G. Wodehouse
Ah the lil’ bookworms! Thanks Huffington Post for brightening our Friday morning!

Ah the lil’ bookworms! Thanks Huffington Post for brightening our Friday morning!

luckypeach:

Our friend and contributor Christina Nichol is over on The Paris Review, talking with Norman Rush and Marco Roth about her new novel, Waiting for the Electricity. Click on over to read a fantastic conversation between very smart people, and then read an excerpt of the novel over on our Medium page!
Photo from Overlook Press

luckypeach:

Our friend and contributor Christina Nichol is over on The Paris Review, talking with Norman Rush and Marco Roth about her new novel, Waiting for the Electricity. Click on over to read a fantastic conversation between very smart people, and then read an excerpt of the novel over on our Medium page!

Photo from Overlook Press

theparisreview:

“For me, comedy is about the disruption of power. It’s about taking the formal and informalizing it, taking the informal and formalizing it. That’s the power that Georgia understands, and that’s the way they’ve been able to live, to stay sane—by turning their suffering upside down, turning what they have no control over upside down.”
Norman Rush and Marco Roth interview Christina Nichol on her debut novel, Waiting for the Electricity, the direction of the comic novel, and fiction’s bearing on foreign policy.

theparisreview:

“For me, comedy is about the disruption of power. It’s about taking the formal and informalizing it, taking the informal and formalizing it. That’s the power that Georgia understands, and that’s the way they’ve been able to live, to stay sane—by turning their suffering upside down, turning what they have no control over upside down.”

Norman Rush and Marco Roth interview Christina Nichol on her debut novel, Waiting for the Electricity, the direction of the comic novel, and fiction’s bearing on foreign policy.

Recent haul

franzencomesalive:

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- Beginning Pearls by Stephan Patsis

- Invisible Streets by Toby Ball

- Blue Asylum by Kathy Hepinstall

- The Return of Zita the Space Girl by Ben Hatke

- Guy in Real Life by Steve Brezenoff

- Playing the Whore by Melissa Gira Grant

- Going Somewhere by Brian Benson

- We Are…

http://gracereadsbooksandreviewsthem.tumblr.com/post/93976181581/summary-as-the-next-school-year-comes-for-the

matsstrandbergauthor:

gracereadsbooksandreviewsthem:

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Summary: As the next school year comes for the Chosen Ones, they are met with a new enemy, hiding in plain sight.

As book two, Fire, begins, Minoo, Vanessa, Linnéa, Anna-Karin and Ida have been struggling with their own demons all summer long. Now school is back in session, and whether…

THANK YOU!

mandarinorientalnewyork:

St. Mark’s Bookshop (via nevver)

A round of applause for this sleek East Village bookstore design.

“Sometimes when I see my companions lying asleep or resting, rolled in their blankets, their faces turned to earth or hidden in the folds, for a moment I wonder whether they are alive or dead. For at any hour I may come upon them, and find that long silence descended over them, — their faces grey and disfigured, — dark stains of blood soaking through their torn garments, — all their hope & merriment snuffed out for ever.”

—   

WWI poet Siegfried Sassoon in a 1916 diary entry. Sassoon’s war diaries have been digitized for the first time through a project by the Cambridge University Library. As the Two-Way blog reported, nearly two dozen diaries and notebooks have been made available.

(via nprbooks)

Check out Jean Moorcroft Wilson’s new SIEGFRIED SASSOON biography for more!